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Teaching with Technology 2016: Call for Proposals

The 2016 Teaching with Technology Summit: Next-Generation Teaching & Learning is scheduled for Tuesday, October 4, 2016, 11:30am – 5:00pm, Newcomb Ballroom, Newcomb Hall and Robertson Media Center, 3rd floor, Clemons Library.

Presently, there is a “Call for Proposals.” UVa faculty, staff, and graduate students are eligible to submit proposals. The deadline for submissions is Monday, August 1; presenters will be notified no later than Friday, September 2, 2016.

TWT 2016: Submit your proposal now!

Designed for faculty, instructors, and researchers at the University of Virginia, the Teaching with Technology Summit is a free annual event featuring success stories of faculty integrating teaching and technology.

Gain strategies for maximizing technology in your teaching and research, learn about available resources for your courses, and exchange best practices with fellow instructors at workshops and demos!

Contact twt@virginia.edu with any questions.

Scholars’ Lab Event: GIS Day 2015

Wednesday, November 18
1:30-3:00 p.m. · Alderman Library, Scholars’ Lab Common Room
The Scholars’ Lab celebrates GIS Day 2015! They’ll host lighting round talks – showcasing a variety of GIS projects from across Grounds and around Charlottesville – from 1:30 – 3:00 p.m. in the Common Room. The reveal of their annual (and always mappy!) GIS Day cake will follow. Please join them for the festivities!

Special Workshop in Data Science by Dr. Mark Algee-Hewitt

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Workshop Announcement *

The Center for the Study of Data and Knowledge and the Data Sciences Institute

present

Dr. Mark Algee-Hewitt
Assistant Professor of English &
Co-Director of the Stanford Literary Lab
Stanford University

“Dramatic Networks Workshop”

Tuesday, October 13, 2015
2:00-3:15pm
Alderman Library 317

* Please Note: Workshop space is limited. Please RSVP to Chris Jewell at shanti@virginia.edu to reserve a spot.

Mark Algee-Hewitt is Assistant Professor in the department of English at Stanford University and the Co- Director of the Literary Lab. His work focuses on the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries in England and Germany and seeks to combine literary criticism with digital and quantitative analyses of literary texts. At the Literary Lab, Mark leads projects on suspense literature, the relationship between titles and texts in the long eighteenth century, and gender performance in the dialogue of novels written during the Romantic period.

Although most quantitative analysis of literature focuses on the analysis of existing corpora of texts, one of the most exciting areas of research consists of modeling a range of possible texts, given a set of initial conditions. This practical workshop will discuss the Literary Lab’s latest work on the Dramatic Networks project, for which an interface has been created that allows the user to simulate plays based on four simple parameters. Both the logic and re- search application of dramatic models will be discussed and soon-to-be available software for modeling literary interaction networks will be demonstrated.

For further information contact Paul Humphreys (pwh2a@virginia.edu) or Raf Alvarado (rca2t@eservices.virginia.edu)

Special Lecture in Data Science by Dr. Mark Algee-Hewitt

Algee-Hewitt copy

Lecture Announcement

The Center for the Study of Data and Knowledge and the Data Sciences Institute

present

Dr. Mark Algee-Hewitt
Assistant Professor of English &
Co-Director of the Stanford Literary Lab
Stanford University

“Read, Write, Respond: Data, Affect, and Narrative”

Tuesday, October 13, 2015
5:00-6:30ppm
Monroe 130

Mark Algee-Hewitt is Assistant Professor in the department of English at Stanford University and the Co- Director of the Literary Lab. His work focuses on the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries in England and Germany and seeks to combine literary criticism with digital and quantitative analyses of literary texts. At the Literary Lab, Mark leads projects on suspense literature, the relationship between titles and texts in the long eighteenth century, and gender performance in the dialogue of novels written during the Romantic period.

Chief among the criticisms of the quantitative study of literary texts is that the approach is rigidly formalistic: data on word frequencies leave little room for other kinds of critical interventions. How, for example, can information about words, syntax or grammar reveal textual features that trigger particular affective responses in different readers? In this talk I explore the phenomenon of suspense, an aesthetic experience that has resisted literary critical or even psychological explanation. By interleaving multiple kinds of data, I show that the emerging methods of the Digital Humanities are uniquely suited to exploring the boundaries between text and affect, reader and researcher, and formal structure and aesthetic experience. In this project, I seek to open up a new area of study in our field, one that combines the richly formalistic approach of quantitative analysis with a deeper understanding of the text as a uniquely affective communicative medium.

10/2/15: Special Lecture in Data Science (Speaker: Dr. Budhendra Bhaduri)

Special Lecture:
Presented by The Data Science Institute
and The Office of the Vice President for Research

Bhaduri copyDr. Budhendra Bhaduri
Director, Urban Dynamics Institute
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Big Data for Future Energy and Urban Infrastructures: Challenges and Opportunities

Friday, October 2, 2015
1:30pm
Minor Hall 125

Abstract:

In this rapidly urbanizing world, unprecedented rate of population growth is not only mirrored by increasing demand for energy, food, water, and other natural resources, but has detrimental impacts on environmental and human security. Much of our scientific and technological focus has been to ensure a sustainable future with healthy people living on a healthy planet where energy, environment, and mobility interests are simultaneously optimized. Ability to observe and measure through direct instrumentation of our environment and infrastructures from buildings to planet scale, coupled with explosion of data from citizen sensors brings much promise for capturing the social/behavioral dimension and provides a unique opportunity to manage and increase efficiencies of existing built environments as well as design a more sustainable future. This presentation will explore the intriguing developments in the world of Big Data, geospatial computing, and plausible ways citizens can all become part of the open data economy for advancing science and society.

For more information visit:
dsi.virginia.edu/Bhaduri-Lecture

Flyer: Lecture-Flyer-Bhaduri